Fairchild Books: Book review requested in exchange for free book

Photo by David Lezcano on Unsplash

Greetings colleagues!

It’s been ages since I last posted and I hope you’re all well. I thought you’d like to hear about a wonderful offer for FTC SIG members, along with the opportunity to shape an information resource that will be useful to us all.

Fairchild Books is currently considering publishing a new text titled The Fairchild Books Dictionary of Fashion Details, a visual reference for a full range of contemporary garment parts as well as classic and historical styles. Would you be interested in replying to this brief review survey to give your feedback on what you would like to see included in this text?

https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=EhEUMOud80C-HK92sH16BtFgCKT1VE5Ls-4qmCR0cB5UM0s0UTkxNTlISkoyRVJYNkJSN0MzWTVXNy4u  

The honorarium for a completed review survey will be your choice of any book (of up to $100 value) from Bloomsbury.com.  The survey should only take a few minutes to complete.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Jenna Lefkowitz at Bloomsbury (contact information below.)

Very best wishes to you all,

Sandra Ley, FTC SIG Founder

sjley@pima.edu

Jenna Lefkowitz, Assistant Editor

Fairchild Books, a division of Bloomsbury Publishing Inc.

1385 Broadway, 5th Floor

New York, NY 10018

Phone: 212-419-5414 / Email: jenna.lefkowitz@bloomsbury.com

Bingeable: Making the Cut

Warning: fan girl post

I binged Making the Cut and I loved it.

The designers / contestants in this reality show create products, and each episode’s winning clothes are “immediately” available to actually purchase online via Amazon. I know, I know, its so commercial… and wonderful all at the same time.

Plus I can use the fashions and lessons here in the classroom to show that we can design and market for real people at affordable prices and still make a successful brand.

Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn of Project Runway fame, are back with a broader vision: finding not just a good garment, but an all-around designer/entrepreneur to be the “next global fashion brand.” The challenges go beyond the clothes, to include managing a working group, creating an ad campaign, and standing the pressure of competition. In both the first and second season, I thought they picked the person who could do all that and be a design wizard, too.

The week I watched the second season, I dreamed about being a designer — which was useful in that it pushed out so many other contemporary worries. For several days running, there was no pandemic in my thoughts. Nice break.

Also, I thought the styles were worth the watch. In the first challenge, Gary Graham made a handkerchief hem dress out of an army blanket and an indigo batik he created himself. It won the night, as well it should. I seldom disagreed with the judges, so the experience was satisfying.

Several designers on this year’s show emphasized designing for all kinds of bodies, a breath of fresh air. This is something I can take into the classroom as an example of working with real people and being successful. The clothes are not priced in the stratosphere, either. Mr. Graham’s dress is $79.90.

Recommended! Enjoy!

The University of Rhode Island Historic Textile and Costume Collection

The University of Rhode Island Historic Textile and Costume Collection is a digital collection developed in 2018 by the university libraries in cooperation with the College of Business’s Department of Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design.

The physical collection, established in 1951, includes textiles, costumes and ephemera from Rhode Island and all over the world, spanning in time from ancient Egyptian cloth to garments by 20th century designers. It was developed to support teaching at the university, encourage research, and provide artifacts for use in classes and exhibitions. Only a small portion of the physical collection—which numbers more than 25,000 objects—have been photographed or digitised for inclusion in the digital collection.

One of the goals of this digital initiative is to publicise the collection and make it more accessible in an online format. In Historic Textile and Costume Collection in the Academic Setting Linda Welters and Margaret Ordoñez note that digital fashion, textile and costume collections provide for greater collection access, detailed imagery and the ability to view the collection, whilst minimising handling of the actual objects. Additionally, they point out that linked data and further information such as donor records, exhibition history and conservation issues make a digital collection more complete.

Digital fashion, textile and costume collections provide for greater collection access, detailed imagery and the ability to view the collection, whilst minimising handling of the actual objects.

Linda Welters and Margaret Ordoñez

The collection uses the Omeka content management system, which allows libraries, archives and museums, as well as scholarly collections to host visual content and develop digital exhibitions. The platform is customisable to the needs of the developer, allowing a plug-and-play system without the need for advanced computer coding knowledge. 

The landing page features university branding, a search bar and five main subpages: About, Browse Collections, Exhibitions, News and Contact Us. Next a visual header from an item in the collection, recently added items, a featured item, featured [sub]collection and a featured exhibit. Administrative data regarding ownership, funding information and a copyright notice are located at the foot of the page.

As of September 2021, the digital Historic Textile and Costume Collection collection has 19 thematic subcollections, with titles such as “Accessories” and “Materials of the future” which contain as few as two or as many as 70 items. Each subcollections contains metadata such as subject, title, date range, description and contributor, in addition to images and links to the digital objects. Social media links, not visible on the collection homepage do appear within the subcollection record.

“Cubism” University of Rhode Island Historic Textile and Costume Collection

The digital object record includes entries on subject, data, format, description, source, accession identifier, collection contributor, (original) creator, medium, provenance as well as an indexical subcollection hyperlink, the suggested citation and social bookmarking links. The source entry contains information related to the physical item’s donor, and in some records notates that it was a university purchase. Some objects’ records list just a name, while others have a more complete record of the item’s provenance and include information about the item’s initial appraisal. Object description ranges from a few sentences to fully-researched entries with accompanying bibliographic information. 

Regarding imagery, besides a digital photograph of the full textile, there are a variety of images included in the different records. For example, the Cubist textile record from ​​the Tirocchi subcollection contains just one image and is enlargeable. The record for the Woman’s Velveteen Top by Pucci contains a full image of the garment, and also one close-up photo of the collar and label. An enlargement of the Pucci image shows that the photo is not in a high enough resolution to allow for a closer look. However, the record for Woman’s Apron, Hutsul Culture, Ukraine, features two additional high-resolution close-up photos allowing for a very detailed inspection.

An analysis of contributors to the objects’ scholarship and description reveals a mix of undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as faculty from the Department of Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design, highlighting the use of this digital collection as an important education tool used to support scholarship in the fields of fashion, textile and costume studies.

Besides the digital collection, which is accessible via the library’s digital collections website, the only other access point for the physical collection is the Quinn Hall Textile Gallery, a small rotating exhibition space on campus. The digital collection supports the gallery through digital documentation of current and previous exhibitions and allows for greater access to the collection material. For example, the most recent exhibit, Jessica Strubel’s The Kaleidoscope of Textiles: Dress as Multidimensional Cultural Documents has also been digitally curated within the collection allowing for the exhibit to be seen by a worldwide audience.

In an Analysis of University Historic Clothing and Textile Websites Catherine Murphy suggests a successful digital collection includes images, accompanying text, exhibitions, and social networking links, as well as funding, copyright and site developer information. The digital Historic Textile and Costume Collection includes all of this information and is an example of a successful digital collection. Some recommended improvements would be to develop a standard for imagery including multiple views and closeups within the digital object records, standardisation of metadata fields throughout the collection, provide links to related resources and an increase of information in the entries for some of the objects who lack detailed information.

The strength of this collection is its function—not only as a digital surrogate of the physical collection, but the department’s integration of the collection as a digital humanities laboratory and the creation, transmission and preservation of departmental scholarship.

*Header “Arts and Crafts Movement,” University of Rhode Island Historic Textile and Costume Collection