Introducing your 2021-22 Moderating Team!

Cheryl Miller is the Head, Library Metadata and Discovery Services at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles, CA. After attending Pomona College in Claremont, CA and UCLA GLIS in Los Angeles, Cheryl worked at other museum libraries and cataloged for a private collector before finding a home at the Autry. She has presented at ARLIS-NA Conference, RBMS Conference, California Rare Book School, and the Association of Tribal Libraries, Archives and Museums annual Conference. Currently, Cheryl is working with the Autry’s Metadata Team to create a new thesaurus of updated name and subject terms for indigenous names, subjects, languages, and locations, with the goal of addressing how the groups refer to themselves.

“I look forward to serving as FTC Co-Moderator and discovering new ways to highlight our extremely varied work in Fashion, Textiles and Costumes librarianship.”

Caetllonn Seadjwyc recently acquired her MLIS from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to embarking on a career in librarianship, she designed, manufactured, and sold her jewellery collection throughout both Canada and the US, among many other endeavors. Caetllonn has long since demonstrated an affinity for all things fashion, textile, and costume related, most recently evidenced by an ever-expanding series of style-related Pinterest boards and far too many pieces of vintage fabric tucked away in her storage closet.

“I’m delighted to be part of a community that is as interested and inspired by garments and the many varied stories they tell—some frivolous, some political, but always intriguing—as I am! I look forward to interacting with as many FTC SIG members as possible during my time as a Co-Moderator… and beyond, too.”

Emily Anna Smith holds an MLS from Rutgers University, a BA in history from Mary Washington College, and has completed coursework at the Fashion Institute of Technology.  She is the Interlibrary Loan Coordinator at Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ.  While her career has largely focused on cataloging and interlibrary loan, her heart has always dwelled in the realm of fashion.  She has been fortunate enough to dovetail her professional skills in organization, classification, and research with her sartorial passions.  Her scholarship centers on the ways social media transmits and shapes perceptions of fashion and has become a tool to explore the nexus of fashion and identity.  She has given two presentations at separate Fashion: Now & Then conferences at LIM College that use the microcosm of the red carpet at the Academy Awards to explore these themes.  The first was “Who Are You Wearing?” How Social Media and the Oscars Red Carpet Have Democratized the Discussion of Fashion (2013) and the second Whatever Lola Wants: Billy Porter, Gender Norms, and Social Media on the Oscars Red Carpet (2019). You can follow her on twitter @oscarscloset.

“I am excited and honored to be part of a community with so many fascinating and important stories to tell.  Fashion, textiles, and costume are such a vital aspect of contemporary and historic cultures.  I’m looking forward to meeting you, virtually and in person, and learning about your work and passions.  It is my pleasure to serve as your Vice-Moderator.”

Introducing Co-Vice Moderator Caetllonn Seadjwyc!

Caetllonn Seadjwyc recently acquired her MLIS from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to embarking on a career in librarianship, she designed, manufactured, and sold her jewellery collection throughout both Canada and the US, among many other endeavors. Caetllonn has long since demonstrated an affinity for all things fashion, textile, and costume related, most recently evidenced by an ever-expanding series of style-related Pinterest boards and far too many pieces of vintage fabric tucked away in her storage closet. 


“I’m delighted to be part of a community that is as interested and inspired by garments and the many varied stories they tell—some frivolous, some political, but always intriguing—as I am! I look forward to interacting with as many FTC SIG members as possible during my time as a co-vice moderator… and beyond, too.”

SPARC Digital – FIT’s Special Collections and College Archives Digital Platform

SPARC Digital is a platform created by FIT’s Special Collections and College Archives (SPARC) to showcase their rare and unique materials in digital form.

Screen shot of SPARC Digital Record for Fashion plate from Les Idées Nouvelles, 1927

Featuring images from dozens of collections comprised of original fashion sketches, photographs, illustrations, and historic fashion plates, it includes examples of women’s wear, menswear, children’s wear, millinery, footwear, jewelry, and costume created between the 18th and 20th centuries. Significant collections include the Bergdorf Goodman archives, Frances Neady Collection of Original Fashion Illustrations, Halston Hats sketches, Jerry Miller Shoe designs, Joseph Love Children’s Wear sketches, Helena Rubinstein Foundation photographs, and many more.

One of the more exciting features of SPARC Digital is the ability to search and browse the collection by color. Faceted searching is also available, allowing users to drill down into their search, narrowing the results by medium, subject, format, creator, and collection

With the goal of making the collections more accessible online, SPARC is continually adding content and will be prioritizing material that is in the public domain to encourage our users to creatively re-use our collections. Where possible, SPARC has reviewed material and has included a rights statement in the metadata associated with each item. This rights statement indicates whether a researcher may or may not reuse an item and the permission needed to do so.

Cornell University Library Acquires the Recently Closed American Textile History Museum Collection

“A massive collection documenting the U.S. textile industry is set to become one of Cornell University Library’s largest acquisitions ever. The collection, from the Osborne Library at the recently closed American Textile History Museum (ATHM), is expected to fill eight or nine tractor-trailers when it arrives in Ithaca this spring. It comprises around 90,000 books, periodicals, manuscript collections, photographs, textile sample books, tintypes, glass plate negatives and trade catalogs that tell the story of the textile industry in New England and across the country.”

Read more about this here.

Link to Cornell University Library website here.

Symposium: Dressing New York: Identity and Experience 5/13, 12-6pm NYC

Students in the Fashion Institute of Technology’s Fashion and Textile Studies Master of Arts program have organized a daylong symposium that takes place on Saturday, May 13, 2017 from noon-6 p.m. Details below, hope to see you there!

 

DRESSING NEW YORK: IDENTITY AND EXPERIENCE

The Annual Research Symposium of the Fashion and Textiles: History, Theory, Museum Practice Program at FIT’s School of Graduate Studies

A commercial and cultural capital, New York is the center of the American fashion industry, home of fashion innovators in design, production, and retail. Creators of both luxurious custom clothing and ready-to-wear sportswear have found a place in New York, as have the retailers who marketed and sold these items and the journalists who authored the fashion news for the American public. Yet the New York dress experience goes beyond the industry, encompassing a diversity of expressions of individuals and subcultures, all drawn to the energy of this place of extremes.

In this symposium, students in FIT’s MA program in Fashion and Textile Studies will present papers on a range of topics, investigating New York dress in the 19th and 20th centuries. From issues of gender and dress reform to design milestones and triumphs of the mainstream fashion system, New Yorkers reimagine and reinvent themselves through dress.